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Chapter Test

Read the questions and choose your answers carefully.

This activity contains 30 questions.

Question 1.
Identify the indicated division of geologic time by selecting the correct response from the list provided.

(Geologic time scale, Copyright © Prentice Hall, Inc.)




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The letters A through F appear on an image associated with this question.

This question presents 6 items numbered 1.1 through 1.6. Each item is presented with a pulldown menu containing the letters A through F. For each item below, use the pull-down menu to select the letter that labels the correct part of the image.
End of Question 1


Question 2.
Complete this chart by choosing the best answer to mark the times of appearance and abundance of major groups of organisms.

(Picture from Earth Science, 11th edition Copyright © Prentice Hall, Inc.)




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The letters A through C appear on an image associated with this question.

This question presents 3 items numbered 2.1 through 2.3. Each item is presented with a pulldown menu containing the letters A through C. For each item below, use the pull-down menu to select the letter that labels the correct part of the image.
End of Question 2


Question 3.
Earth's first primitive atmosphere was composed entirely of nitrogen.


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Question 4.
The largest division of geologic time is a period.


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Question 5.
Earth's original atmosphere consisted of gases expelled from within the planet during a process known as


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Question 6.
Plants are responsible for dramatically altering the composition of the entire planet's atmosphere.


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Question 7.
The current distribution of continents and oceans today resemble what Earth probably looked like 4.5 billion years ago.


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Question 8.
The smallest divisions of the geologic time scale are referred to as


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Question 9.
We know key information about the Precambrian from studying many items, including


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Question 10.
Which block of geologic time spans the largest percentage of Earth's history?


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Question 11.
The Devonian period is often called the "age of fishes."


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Question 12.
Which of the following events could have contributed to the late Paleozoic Extinction?


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Question 13.
No life forms possessed hard parts until the late Paleozoic.


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Question 14.
The "Cambrian Explosion" refers to


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Question 15.
The supercontinent of Pangaea formed during the late ____________ era.


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Question 16.
Trilobites were abundant and flourished during the Cambrian period.


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Question 17.
North American coal deposits are associated with vast swamps that existed during the Pennsylvanian Period.


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Question 18.
The most recent 540 million years of Earth's history are divided into four eras: Phanerozoic, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic.


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Question 19.
Which of the following statements is true about the breakup of Pangaea?


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Question 20.
Evidence indicates that some dinosaurs, unlike their present-day reptile relatives, were warm-blooded.


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Question 21.
The Mesozoic era ends at the K-T boundary.


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Question 22.
Reptiles were dominant during the Mesozoic.


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Question 23.
The Mesozoic era is the least understood span of Earth's history.


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Question 24.
Which of the following is not associated with or not true about gymnosperms?


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Question 25.
For much of North America, Triassic period rock deposits predominantly indicate


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Question 26.
___________ mammals develop within the mother's body for a longer period of time and the young are relatively mature at birth.


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Question 27.
Cenozoic means


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Question 28.
Flowering plants with covered seeds are called


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Question 29.
The Cenozoic is best known as the


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Question 30.
The Basin and Range province stretching from northern Nevada into Mexico formed through crustal movement and high heat flow during the __________ epoch.

 
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