EARTH: AN INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOLOGY

Chapter 21: Energy and Mineral Resources

Concept #5 Quiz

Choose the best possible answer to the following questions about Key Concept 5 "Mineral resources: Igneous and metamorphic processes."

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1. What is the difference between what is called an “ore” and what is classified as “industrial rocks and minerals”? Choose the two that apply. [Hint]

2.

Match the type of igneous or metamorphic process with the correct mineral resource: [Hint]

Using the pulldown boxes, match each item on the left to the corresponding item at right.

A. many different types of deposits used for many purposes from ceramics to copper wire
B. large deposits of graphite and lead associated with local heating of rocks
C. veins of gold, silver, zinc and lead deposits from metal-rich fluids, some of which are at “black smokers”
D. produces diamond that is carried to the surface by explosive forces
 [Hint]
 

3. Which of the following is the magmatic process that concentrates minerals into what becomes an ore? Choose all that apply. [Hint]

4.

Indicate the appropriate description of the process occurring at each label on the diagram:  

For each item below, use the pull-down menu to select the letter that labels the correct part of the image.

The letters A through E appear on an image associated with this question.

5.

Indicate the appropriate description of the process occurring at each label on the diagram:  

For each item below, use the pull-down menu to select the letter that labels the correct part of the image.

The letters A through D appear on an image associated with this question.

6. How do deposits of graphite form, typically? [Hint]

7. This is an image and model of the location of a "black smoker." Which igneous or metamorphic process is responsible for this phenomenon?

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Some questions in this exercise may have more than one correct answer. And answer choices in this exercise are randomized and will appear in a different order each time the page is loaded.
 




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