|  Applied Anthropology  |  Overview

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Overview

Applied Anthropology

Employment surveys show that from 29 to 54 percent of graduating American Ph.D.’s in anthropology are working in nonacademic practicing settings. In addition, there are a thousand or so master’s-degree and as many as eight thousand bachelor’s-degree annual graduates from anthropology programs in the United States and Canada (American Anthropological Association 1997: 308–321). Most of them end up in some form of nonacademic practice.

There have been significant and positive transformations in training for nonacademic practice. Since the establishment of the first specialized program in the nonacademic practice at the University of South Florida in 1974, about thirty revamped practitioners’ programs have been established. A growing body of literature supports the field of applied and practicing anthropology.. There are now thousands of highly competent graduates coming from the specialized programs, and people have discovered, through their own diligent efforts on the job, how to best improve the practice of anthropology. They represent the field through international aid agencies, schools of business, medicine, public administration, architecture, charitable organizations, state, federal, provincial, and municipal agencies, unions, policy research institutes, private consulting companies, and advocacy and consumer protection agencies. Many other venues have yet to be heard from, and more will undoubtedly open up in the future.

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