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Multiple Choice



This activity contains 15 questions.

Question 1.
When we speak of the Reformation we mean the


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Question 2.
The Protestant Reformation simply means the


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Question 3.
When Martin Luther published his ninety-five theses in 1517, this idea was


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Question 4.
Luther said, in effect, the church should not do things that had no


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Question 5.
Martin Luther translated the New Testament into


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Question 6.
What is now called the “Protestant Ethic” means the


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Question 7.
When historians refer to a “Northern Renaissance,” they really meant


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Question 8.
The Ottoman Empire at its height was ruled from


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Question 9.
The first genuinely humanist artist of the northern Renaissance was


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Question 10.
The most important and famous Christian humanist of this northern Renaissance was


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Question 11.
Thomas More’s Utopia was a Christian answer to


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Question 12.
The one art form that thrived in Elizabethan times was


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Question 13.
A systematic attitude of doubt toward any claim of knowledge is called


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Question 14.
Shakespeare’s versatility in the theatre was matched by William Byrd’s excellence in


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Question 15.
The Catholic Church’s effort to reform itself was called the


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