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Inductive and Deductive Reasoning.
http://www.sjsu.edu/depts/itl/graphics/induc/ind-ded.html#exer
This is a fun website that is actually a tutorial to help you gain a clearer understanding of the differences between and the applications of inductive and deductive reasoning. You will finish a short tutorial and then go to a self-grading set of questions on the two processes. You will receive instant feedback on your answers. If you have answered a question incorrectly, you will be sent to a tutorial within that website to help you gain greater understanding of the two processes.

Enhancing Higher Order Learning Through Technology
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/cap/resources/pubs/eguides/eskills/guidelines/
This website is from England and contains two very useful sections: An Educational Framework for Course and Curriculum Design, and Developing Your Own Course or Curriculum Using Higher Order Learning. Each section has useful headings to help you obtain information on teaching for higher order learning.

Teacher Networking
http://www.kn.att.com/ and
http://www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/index.html
It’s one thing to say that teachers need to network. But how do you do that, especially if you live in a rural area where buildings and districts are far apart or if you teach in a financially strapped district that can’t afford to send teachers to conferences and workshops? The answer is “the Web.” There are hundreds of great websites that allow teachers to network, interact, and exchange great educational ideas. Two of the best are the AT&T Education Knowledge Network Explorer and the New York Times Learning Network Teacher Connections (more appropriate for teachers of grades 6-12). The AT&T website contains sections on searching for other good sites, links to technology sites that support learning, information on building your own website, information on scheduling a free workshop, help on finding money and discounts, information on using your lessons and curriculum, and other general resources. Each of these sections contains multiple bullets with weblinks to literally hundreds of other sites to help teachers network and exchange ideas. The New York Times website changes daily (!) and contains curriculum ideas, topical lesson ideas that tie into today's current events, and places to interact with other teachers and educational professionals.

Converting State Education Standards to Classroom Targets and Activities
http://www2.dpi.state.wi.us/sig/practices/high_2.asp
This website offers information on translating state standards into learning targets and educational activities. On this page are pull-down menus for academic subject, grade, content standard, resource type, and cataloging agency. There is also a search engine where you can type in any special topic or keyword in which you are interested. Each pull-down menu in the search engine leads the teacher to hundreds of websites, all with ideas and activities for converting state standards to real-life educational targets and activities.

Becoming Better Teachers: Making Learning More Student Friendly
http://www.centerforcsri.org/podcasts/pod8/
How do we become better teachers? How do we increase student motivation to learn? These and other questions are addressed on a great website created by the Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement. On this website you can listen to a series of podcasts on a large number of different topics, each based on solid research and translated into everyday practical language and activities for improving teaching, assessment, and student motivation.






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