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Multiple Choice



This activity contains 20 questions.

Question 1.
When testing the null hypothesis using the confidence interval estimate of the difference between two means, one would reject the null hypothesis when


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Question 2.
When the population standard deviations are unknown, both samples are less than 30, and the equal variances assumption cannot be met, which test statistic should be used to test the differences between two independent means


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Question 3.
The t test for the difference between the means of two independent samples assumes that the respective:


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Question 4.
If we are testing for the difference between the means of two independent samples with samples of n1 = 20 and n2 = 20, the number of degrees of freedom is equal to:


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Question 5.
In testing for the differences between the means of two independent populations where the variances in each population are unknown but assumed equal, the degrees of freedom are:


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Question 6.
In testing for differences between the means of two independent populations the null hypothesis states that:


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Question 7.
In testing for differences between the means of two related populations (i.e., Matched-Pairs) where the variance of the differences is unknown, the degrees of freedom are:


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Question 8.
If we are testing for the difference between the means of two related samples with samples of n1 = 20 and n2 = 20, the number of degrees of freedom is equal to:


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Question 9.
When testing for differences between the means of two related populations, the null hypothesis states that:


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Question 10.
The probability distribution used to test for differences between two population variances is the


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Question 11.
When testing for the difference between two population variances with sample sizes of n1 = 8 and n2 = 10, the number of degrees of freedom are:


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Question 12.
The hypothesis test for the equality of two population variances is based on:


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Question 13.
A Pooled-Variance t Test for the Difference Between Two Independent Means may be used when


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Question 14.
Refer to Figure 10.3 on page 373, “Microsoft Excel t test results for the two display locations. Based on the results presented, the pooled-variance would be equal to


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Question 15.
Refer to Figure 10.3 on page 373, “Microsoft Excel t test results for the two display locations. Based on the results presented, the computed t test statistic is


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Question 16.
Refer to Figure 10.3 on page 373, “Microsoft Excel t test results for the two display locations. Based on the results presented, the correct degrees of freedom for this test would be


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Question 17.
Refer to Figure 10.3 on page 373, “Microsoft Excel t test results for the two display locations. Based on the results presented, at what level of statistical significance would the null hypothesis be rejected?


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Question 18.

To investigate the efficacy of a diet, a random sample of 16 male patients is drawn from a population of adult male volunteers is collected. The weight of each individual in the sample is taken at the start of the diet, and at a medical follow-up four weeks later. Assume that the population of differences in weight before versus after the diet follow a normal distribution. What would be the appropriate statistical test to conduct the hypothesis test?

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Question 19.

To investigate the efficacy of a diet, a random sample of 16 male patients is drawn from a population of adult male volunteers is collected. The weight of each individual in the sample is taken at the start of the diet, and at a medical follow-up four weeks later. Assume that the population of differences in weight before versus after the diet follow a normal distribution. If it is hypothesized that the diet will lead to a statistically significant loss in weight, what type of hypothesis test should be conducted?

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Question 20.

See Section 10.3, “Comparing Two Population Proportions,” and refer to Figure #10.11, “Microsoft Excel results for the Z test between two proportions for the hotel guest satisfaction problem,” p. 393. The value for the pooled estimate of the population proportion of successes is

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